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MIFARE RC522 13.56Mhz RFID Reader Module with Tags
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Features:

  • Basic on the Philips MFRC522 Chip
  • Power Voltage : 3.3V 
  • Current :13-26mA
  • Operating frequency: 13.56MHz
  • Read Range: 0 ~ 60mm (mifare1 card)
  • Interface: SPI
  • Dimensions: 40mm × 60mm
  • Size of Round Tag : 0.87 × 85.5 × 54 mm
  • Size of Rectangle Tag : 32 x 40.5 x 4.2  mm
  •  This RFID kit includes a 13.56M RF reader module, which use the RC522 IC, plus 2 S50 RFID cards to help you learn and add the 13.56 MHz RF transition to your project. The MF RC522 is a highly integrated transmission module for contactless communication at 13.56 MHz, it supports ISO 14443A/MIFARE mode, this transmission module utilizes an outstanding modulation and demodulation concept completely integrated for different kinds of contactless communication methods and protocols at 13.56 MHz. This RF reader uses SPI to communicate with microcontroller such as Arduino, there are already lots projects in the open-hardware community to achieve the 13.56M RFID transmission, using Arduino.

    Usage Demo

    Specification

    • Operating Current :13-26mA/DC 3.3V
    • Idle Current :10-13mA/DC 3.3V
    • Sleep Current: <80uA
    • Peak Current: <30mA
    • Operating Frequency: 13.56MHz
    • Supported card types: mifare1 S50, mifare1 S70 MIFARE Ultralight, mifare Pro, MIFARE DESFire
    • Environmental Operating Temperature: -20-80 degrees Celsius
    • Environmental Storage Temperature: -40-85 degrees Celsius
    • Relative humidity: relative humidity 5% -95%
    • Reader Distance: ≥50mm/1.95"(mifare 1 )
    • Module Size: 40mm×60mm/1.57*2.34"
    • Module interfaces SPI Parameter
    • Data transfer rate: maximum 10Mbit/s

    Features

    • MF RC522 is applied to the highly integrated read and write.
    • 13.56MHz contactless communication card chip.
    • Low-voltage, low-cost, small size of the non-contact card chip to read and write.
    • Smart meters and portable handheld devices developed better choice.
    • The MF RC522 use of advanced modulation and demodulation concept completely integrated in all types of 13.56MHz passive contactless communication methods and protocols.
    • 14443A compatible transponder signals.
    • The digital part of to handle the ISO14443A frames and error detection.
    • support rapid CRYPTO1 encryption algorithm, terminology validation MIFARE products.
    • MFRC522 support MIFARE series of high-speed non-contact communication, two-way data transmission rate up to 424kbit/s.
    • MF RC522 are similar to MF RC500 MF RC530 , but also have the characteristics and differences. Communication between it and the host SPI mode helps to reduce the connection narrow PCB board volume, reduce costs.
    • The MF522-AN module design circuit card reader, easy to use.
    • Low cost, and applies to the user equipment development.
    • The reader and advanced applications development meet the user RF card terminal design/production needs.
    • This module can be directly loaded into the various reader molds, very convenient.

    Package

    • 1 x A RFID-RC522 Module
    • 1 x The Standard S50 Blank Card
    • 1 x S50 special-shaped card (as shown by the key ring shape)
    • 1 x straight Pin
    • 1 x Curved Pin

    External Link & Download

Barcode Reader/Scanner Module
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This LV4 series linear imaging bar code scanner module features a scan speed of 85 scans/sec with small footprint to meet all applications.  Built-in LED, Software commands supported and the affordable costs, the durable design with no moving parts delivers the best choice for the contact scanning required application -

This LV4 series linear imaging bar code scanner module features a scan speed of 85 scans/sec with small footprint to meet all applications.  Built-in LED, Software commands supported and the affordable costs, the durable design with no moving parts delivers the best choice for the contact scanning required application.

General
Support Interface: Keyboard or RS232 or USB 
support bar codes: UPC / EAN / JAN & Addon 2/5, Code 39, Code 39 Full
ASCII, Code 11, Matrix 25, Code 128, Code 32, Code 93, Interleave 25, Industrial 25, Codabar / MW7,
MSI / PLESSEY, China Postage

Optical  
Scanning Width: 2.16 inch (55mm) / 50 mm ( calculated by the window)  
scan depth: 2.75 inch (70mm) / 20  mil code width 
light: red light  
Resolution: 0.127mm (5mil)
Support illuminance: 1500 lux Max (fluorescent lamps).

Electrical
Operating Voltage: DC + 5V ± 5%  
Working Current: 130mA  
scanning speed: 100 scan / sec

Environment  
Operating Temperature: 0 ° C to 40 ° C  
Storage temperature: -20 ° C to 60 ° C  
Relative Humidity: 20% to 85% (non-condensing state)  
Earthquake design: 100 cm falling to the ground  Physical  Housing 
material: ABS plastic  
dimensions: 46.90 x 40.70 x 20.95 mm  
weight: 130g

 

Optical Finger print Sensor Module (Arduino Compatible)
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Secure your project with biometrics - this all-in-one optical fingerprint sensor will make adding fingerprint detection and verification super simple. These modules are typically used in safes - there's a high powered DSP chip that does the image rendering, calculation, feature-finding and searching. Connect to any microcontroller or system with TTL serial,

Manual & Specs: http://ewallpk.com/img/cms/Fingerprint user manual.pdf

Specifications:

◆ Supply voltage: DC 3.6 ~ 6.0V 

◆ Supply Current: Current: <120mA

Peak current: <140mA

◆ fingerprint image time: < 1.0 sec.

◆ Window Size: 14 × 18 mm

◆ signature file: 256 bytes

◆ template file: 512 bytes

◆ Storage capacity : 1000 pieces

◆ False Accept Rate (FAR) : < 0.001% ( security level 3Time )

◆ False Reject Rate (FRR) : < 1.0% (security level 3Time)

◆ Search time : < 1.0 seconds ( 1: 500 , the mean)

◆ PC interface: UART ( TTL logic level)

◆ communication baud rate (UART) : (9600 × N) bps where N = 1 ~ 12(default value N = 6 , ie57600 bps ) 

◆ Working environment: temperature    degrees: -20 ° C to + 50 ℃

Relative Humidity: 40 % RH to 85 % RH ( non-condensing)

◆ storage environment: temperature    degrees: -40 ° C to + 85 ℃

Relative humidity: < 85 % H (non-condensing)

◆ Dimensions (L × W × H) : 56 × 20 × 21.5mm

Secure your project with biometrics - this all-in-one optical fingerprint sensor will make adding fingerprint detection and verification super simple. These modules are typically used in safes - there's a high powered DSP chip that does the image rendering, calculation, feature-finding and searching. Connect to any microcontroller or system with TTL serial, and send packets of data to take photos, detect prints, hash and search. You can also enroll new fingers directly - up to 162 finger prints can be stored in the onboard FLASH memory. There's a red LED in the lens that lights up during a photo so you know its working.

 

 

There are basically two requirements for using the optical fingerprint sensor. First is you'll need to enroll fingerprints - that means assigning ID #'s to each print so you can query them later. Once you've enrolled all your prints, you can easily 'search' the sensor, asking it to identify which ID (if any) is currently being photographed.

You can enroll using the windows software (easiest and neat because it shows you the photograph of the print) or with the Arduino sketch (good for when you don't have a windows machine handy or for on-the-road enrolling)

 

Enrolling new users with Windows

The easiest way to enroll a new fingerprint is to use the Windows software. The interface/test software is unfortunately windows-only but you only need to use it once to enroll, to get the fingerprint you want stored in the module.

First up, you'll want to connect the sensor to the computer via a USB-serial converter. The easiest way to do this is to connect it directly to the USB/Serial converter in the Arduino. To do this, you'll need to upload a 'blank sketch' this one works well:

// this sketch will allow you to bypass the Atmega chip// and connect the fingerprint sensor directly to the USB/Serial// chip converter. // Red connects to +5V// Black connects to Ground// White goes to Digital 0// Green goes to Digital 1 void setup() {}void loop() {}

Wire up the sensor as described in the sketch comments after uploading the sketch. Since the sensor wires are so thin and short, we stripped the wire a bit and melted some solder on so it made better contact but you may want to solder the wires to header or similar if you're not getting good conteact. When you plug in the power, you should see the red LED blink to indicate the sensor is working.

 
SFGDemo Software download:
 

Start up the SFGDemo software and click Open Device from the bottom left corner. Select the COM port used by the Arduino
 
 
 
And press OK when done. You should see the following, with a blue success message and some device statistics in the bottom corner. You can change the baud rate in the bottom left hand corner, as well as the "security level" (how sensitive it is) but we suggest leaving those alone until you have everything running and you want to experiment
 
 
 

Lets enroll a new finger! Click the Previewcheckbox and press the Enroll button next to it (Con Enroll means 'Continuous' enroll, which you may want to do if you have many fingers to enroll). When the box comes up, enter in the ID # you want to use. You can use up to 162 ID numbers.

 

The software will ask you to press the finger to the sensor

 

You can then see a preview (if you cliecked the preview checkbox) of the fingerprint

]

 

You will then have to repeat the process, to get a second clean print. Use the same finger!

On success you will get a notice

 

 

If there's a problem such as a bad print or image, you'll have to do it again

 

Searching with the software

Once you have the finger enrolled, it's a good idea to do a quick test to make sure it can be found in the database. Click on the Search button on the right hand side

When prompted, press a different/same finger to the sensor

If it is the same finger, you should get a match with the ID #

 

If it is not a finger in the database, you will get a failure notice

 

Wiring for use with Arduino

Once you've tested the sensor, you can now use it within a sketch to verify a fingerprint. We'll need to rewire the sensor. Disconnect the green and white wires and plug the green wire into digital 2 and the white wire to digital 3. You can change these pins later but for now, use the default pins. Since the sensor wires are so thin and short, we stripped the wire a bit and melted some solder on so it made better contact but you may want to solder the wires to header or similar if you're not getting good contact. When you plug in the power, you should see the red LED blink to indicate the sensor is working.

 

Next, To download click the DOWNLOADS button in the top right corner, rename the uncompressed folder Adafruit_Fingerprint. Check that the Adafruit_Fingerprint folder contains Adafruit_Fingerprint.cpp and Adafruit_Fingerprint.h Place the Adafruit_Fingerprint library folder your /libraries/ folder. You may need to create the libraries subfolder if its your first library. Restart the IDE.

Once you've restarted you should be able to select the File→Examples→Adafruit_Fingerprint→fingerprint example sketch. Upload it to your Arduino as usual. Open up the serial monitor at 9600 baud and when prompted place your finger against the sensor that was already enrolled.

You should see the following:

The 'confidence' is a score number (from 0 to 255) that indicates how good of a match the print is, higher is better. Note that if it matches at all, that means the sensor is pretty confident so you don't have to pay attention to the confidence number unless it makes sense for high security applications.

If you want to have a more detailed report, change the loop() to run getFingerprintID() instead of getFingerprintIDez() - that will give you a detailed report of exactly what the sensor is detecting at each point of the search process.

 

Enrolling with Arduino

We did put together a simple sketch for enrolling a new finger via Arduino - its not as easy to use as the Windows program but it does work. Run theFile→Examples→Adafruit_Fingerprint→enroll sketch and upload it to the Arduino, use the same wiring as above.

When you open up the serial monitor, it will ask for you to type in the ID to enroll - use the box up top to type in a number and click Send

Then go through the enrollment process as indicated. When it has successfully enrolled a finger, it will print Stored!

 

Don't forget to do a search test when you're done enrolling to make sure its all good!